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updated 7:36 AM, May 6, 2020 Europe/Berlin
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DMZ Europe 2016

  • Published in Conferences
A plain conceptual model

This year’s European Data Modeling Zone (DMZ) will take place at the wonderful German capital Berlin and I’m very happy to be again speaker at this great event! This year I’ll speak about how to start with a conceptual model, using a logical model and finally how to model the physical Data Vault. During this session we will do some exercises (no, no push-ups!!) to bring our brains up and running about modeling.

And there are many other great presentations held by data and BI experts from all over the world!

Are you interested? Then I’ll give you a “secret” promotion code to get 10% off! Use Lerner16 when you register for this year’s DMZ!

 

What’s my session about? Here’s the abstract:

From Conceptual to Physical Data Vault Data Model

The fictitious company PennyStockInc needs to build a new data warehouse for their trading department. Due to past experience (project failures, overtime, etc.) the BI Competence Center (BICC) decided this time to build conceptual, logical and physical data models. Conceptual models to gather all information about their trading business, logical models to collect their business requirements and cover both relational databases and NoSQL solutions. For the physical data model the BICC of PennyStockInc decided to choose data vault due to the agility, flexibility and the ability to integrate both relational databases and NoSQL solutions.

Attendees of this session will be a fictitious part of the PennyStockInc BICC Team and will work on some exercises to build the new data warehouse.15MinuteTime

This session explores

  • Basic principles of
  • Conceptual modeling
  • Logical modeling
  • Physical modeling
  • How to model from a conceptual via logical to a physical data vault model
  • How to build and access the physical data model on Relational-DB (EXASOL) and NoSQL-DB (REDIS):
  • Design the data layout on REDIS. Identify the keys to represent the objects and which values this keys need to hold
  • Design the relational data model
  • Access both the key-value store and the relational database.

So long

Dirk

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